Coronavirus (COVID-19)

For health information and advice, read our pages on coronavirus. Learn about the government response to coronavirus on GOV.UK.

Coronavirus

Pin It

COVID-19 is a new illness that can affect your lungs and airways. It's caused by a virus called coronavirus.

The NHS, local authorities, police and fire organisations and third sector and voluntary sector organisations across Staffordshire and Stoke-on-Trent are working very hard to support individuals, families, businesses, care homes and all key workers during the coronavirus outbreak.

It is extremely important that you continue to access NHS services if and when you need to, for example, contacting your GP, NHS 111 and, in emergencies, 999.

This includes continuing to manage a long-term condition, addressing an arising concern about your health, or continuing to attend appointments linked to cancer and so on. Find more information about accessing NHS services during this time, here.

Mental wellbeing is also crucial at this time. You will find helpful links for this and many other areas on this page.

How to avoid catching or spreading coronavirus

Do

  • Wash your hands with soap and water often – do this for at least 20 seconds
  • Always wash your hands when you get home or into work
  • Use hand sanitiser gel if soap and water are not available
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or your sleeve (not your hands) when you cough or sneeze
  • Put used tissues in the bin immediately and wash your hands afterwards
  • Try to avoid close contact with people who are unwell

Don't

  • Do not touch your eyes, nose or mouth if your hands are not clean

Stay alert

We can all help control the virus if we all stay alert. This means you must:

  • Stay at home as much as possible
  • Work from home if you can
  • Limit contact with other people
  • Keep your distance if you go out (2 metres apart where possible)
  • Wash your hands regularly

Self-isolate if you or anyone in your household has symptoms.

Face coverings

The Government is advising that people in England should aim to wear a face covering in some circumstances.

If you can, wear a face covering in an enclosed space where social distancing isn’t possible and where you will come into contact with people you do not normally meet.

They should be worn in crowded areas and for short periods, good examples of where to wear a face-covering are on public transport or in some shops.

The evidence suggests that wearing a face covering does not protect you, but it may protect others if you are infected but have not developed symptoms.

It is important to note that a face covering is not the same as a facemask as the surgical masks or respirators used as part of personal protective equipment by healthcare and other workers. These supplies must continue to be reserved for those who need it.

The type of face covering the majority of the public need, can be something as simple as a scarf or a bandana or, you could make one at home – some simple instructions can be found here

What is the new advice?

  • If you have symptoms of COVID-19 (cough and/or high temperature) you and your household should isolate at home: wearing a face covering does not change this
  • If you can, wear a face covering in enclosed spaces where social distancing isn’t possible and where you will come into contact with people you do not normally meet
  • A cloth face covering should cover your mouth and nose while allowing you to breathe comfortably
  • It is important to wash your hands or use hand sanitiser before putting it on and taking it off
  • Remember to put on your face covering before you enter the enclosed space
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth and store used face coverings in a plastic bag until you have an opportunity to wash them
  • Once removed, make sure you clean any surfaces the face covering has touched.
  • Face coverings should not be used by children under the age of 2 or those who may find it difficult to manage them correctly for example primary school age children unassisted, or those with respiratory conditions
  • People who have problems breathing while wearing a face covering should not wear one
  • You do not need to wear face coverings if you are outdoors or while exercising

Treatment for coronavirus

There is currently no specific treatment for coronavirus.

Antibiotics do not help, as they do not work against viruses.

Treatment aims to relieve the symptoms while your body fights the illness.

You'll need to stay in isolation, away from other people, until you have recovered.

National coronavirus information and advice

There is lots of information available nationally about the coronavirus pandemic.

If you think you have symptoms

Stay at home for 7 days if you have either:

  • a high temperature – you feel hot to touch on your chest or back
  • a new, continuous cough – this means you've started coughing repeatedly
  • a loss of, or change in, your normal sense of smell or taste (anosmia)

Do not go to a GP surgery, pharmacy or hospital.

You do not need to contact 111 to tell them you're staying at home.

Testing for coronavirus is now available to everyone in the UK. See the 'testing' section below to find out more about this.

Read more advice about staying at home.

Urgent advice

Use the NHS 111 online coronavirus service if:

  • you feel you cannot cope with your symptoms at home
  • your condition gets worse
  • your symptoms do not get better after 7 days

Use the 111 online coronavirus service

Only call 111 if you cannot get help online.

Coronavirus and your health

If you would like more information about coronavirus, symptoms and information on how to self-isolate, visit the NHS England website.

You can also find the latest guidance from the government on the government website.

It is very important to look after your mental wellbeing at this time. Public Health England has released advice for during the coronavirus pandemic. Visit the Every Mind Matters webpage for more information.

If you're pregnant and worried about coronavirus, you can get advice about coronavirus and pregnancy from the Royal College of Obstretricians and Gynaecologists.

It can be difficult to explain to children what coronavirus is and why the current measures are in place. This fact sheet for children can help you to communicate with youngsters. Childrens Coronavirus Fact Sheet

You can find information in alternative formats and languages in the ‘useful resources’ section below.

Testing

Anyone experiencing a new, continuous cough; high temperature; and now also a loss of or change in your normal sense of smell or taste can book a test by visiting www.nhs.uk/coronavirus

Those unable to access the internet can call 119 in England and Wales or 0300 303 2713 in Scotland and Northern Ireland to book a test.

All members of their household must also self-isolate accoring to current guidelines, unless the symptomatic individual receives a negative test result.

The local Regional Testing Centre is at Stoke City Football Club's Bet365 Stadium in Stoke-on-Trent. People must visit the website above in order to book an appointment at this site.

We have one other 'satelite' testing centre within Staffordshire for staff from Health, Local Authorities, Police and Fire, and members of their households. Testing at the site is only available by booking an appointment. Staff members can find out how to access these testing services by contacting their organisations.

 

NHS Test and Trace

The government has launched the NHS Test and Trace service as part of the coronavirus recovery strategy. This will mean anyone with symptoms will be tested and their close contacts will be traced. New guidance means those who have been in close contact with someone who tests positive must isolate for 14 days, even if they have no symptoms, to avoid unknowingly spreading the virus.

Anyone who tests positive for coronavirus will be contacted by NHS Test and Trace and will need to share information about their recent interactions. This could include household members, people with whom they have been in direct contact, or within 2 metres for more than 15 minutes.

If those in isolation develop symptoms, they can book a test at nhs.uk/coronavirus or by calling 119. If they test positive, they must continue to stay at home for 7 days or until their symptoms have passed. If they test negative, they must complete the 14-day isolation period.

Members of their household will not have to stay at home unless the person identified becomes symptomatic, at which point they must also self-isolate for 14 days to avoid unknowingly spreading the virus.

The NHS test and trace service will help to control the rate of reproduction (R), reduce the spread of the infection and save lives. By playing your part through the actions set out below, you will directly help to contain the virus by reducing its spread. This means that, thanks to your efforts, we will be able to go as far as it is safe to go in easing lockdown measures.

You can help in the following ways:

  • if you develop symptoms, you must continue to follow the rules to self-isolate with other members of your household and order a test to find out if you have coronavirus
  • if you test positive for coronavirus, you must share information promptly about your recent contacts through the NHS test and trace service to help us alert other people who may need to self-isolate
  • if you have had close recent contact with someone who has coronavirus, you must self-isolate if the NHS test and trace service advises you to do so

This specific guidance applies in England only.

If the NHS test and trace service contacts you, the service will use text messages, email or phone.

Contact tracers will:

  • call you from 0300 013 5000
  • send you text messages from ‘NHS’
  • ask you to sign into the NHS test and trace contact-tracing website
  • ask for your full name and date of birth to confirm your identity, and postcode to offer support while self-isolating
  • ask about the coronavirus symptoms you have been experiencing
  • ask you to provide the name, telephone number and/or email address of anyone you have had close contact with in the 2 days prior to your symptoms starting
  • ask if anyone you have been in contact with is under 18 or lives outside of England

Contact tracers will never:

  • ask you to dial a premium rate number to speak to us (for example, those starting 09 or 087)
  • ask you to make any form of payment or purchase a product or any kind
  • ask for any details about your bank account
  • ask for your social media identities or login details, or those of your contacts
  • ask you for any passwords or PINs, or ask you to set up any passwords or PINs over the phone
  • disclose any of your personal or medical information to your contacts
  • provide medical advice on the treatment of any potential coronavirus symptoms
  • ask you to download any software to your PC or ask you to hand over control of your PC, smartphone or tablet to anyone else
  • ask you to access any website that does not belong to the government or NHS

They will ask you:

  • if you have family members or other household members living with you. In line with the medical advice they must remain in self-isolation for the rest of the 14-day period from when your symptoms began
  • if you have had any close contact with anyone other than members of your household. We are interested in in the 48 hours before you developed symptoms and the time since you developed symptoms. Close contact means:
    • having face-to-face contact with someone (less than 1 metre away)
    • spending more than 15 minutes within 2 metres of someone
    • travelling in a car or other small vehicle with someone (even on a short journey) or close to them on a plane
  • if you work in – or have recently visited – a setting with other people (for example, a GP surgery, a school or a workplace)

They will ask you to provide, where possible, the names and contact details (for example, email address, telephone number) for the people you have had close contact with. As with your own details these will be held in strict confidence and will be kept and used only in line with data protection laws.

How NHS Test and Trace works for someone with coronavirus symptoms

  • isolate: As soon as you experience coronavirus symptoms, you should self-isolate for at least 7 days. Anyone else in your household should self-isolate for 14 days from when you started having symptoms.
  • test: You should order a coronavirus test immediately at uk/coronavirus or call 119 if you have no internet access.
  • results: If your test is positive you must complete the remainder of your 7-day self-isolation. Anyone in your household should also complete self-isolation for 14 days from when you started having symptoms. If your test is negative, you and other household members no longer need to isolate.
  • share contacts: If you test positive for coronavirus, the NHS Test and Trace service will send you a text or email alert or call you within 24 hours with instructions of how to share details of people you have been in close, recent contact with and places you have visited. It is important that you respond as soon as possible so that we can give appropriate advice to those who need it. You will be asked to do this online via a secure website or you will be called by one of our NHS contact tracers.

How NHS Test and Trace works for those contacted if you have been in close contact with someone who has tested positive for coronavirus

  • alert: You will be alerted by the NHS Test and Trace service if you have been in close contact with someone who has tested positive for coronavirus. The alert will come either by text or email and you’ll need to log on to the NHS Test and Trace website, which is the easiest way for you and the service to communicate with each other – but, if not, a trained call handler will talk you through what you need to do. Under 18’s will get a phone call and a parent or guardian will be asked to give permission for the call to continue.
  • isolate: You will be asked to begin self-isolation for up to 14 days, depending on when you last came into contact with the person who has tested positive. It’s really important to do this even if you don’t feel unwell, because it can take up to 14 days for the symptoms to develop. This will be crucial to avoid you unknowingly spreading the virus to others. Your household doesn’t need to self-isolate with you, but they must take extra care to follow the guidance on social distancing and washing your hands.
  • test if needed: If you develop symptoms of coronavirus, other members of your household should self-isolate at home and you should book a coronavirus test at https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/coronavirus-covid-19/ or call 119 if you have no internet access. If your test is positive you must continue to stay at home for 7 days. If your test is negative, you must still complete your 14 day self-isolation period because the virus may not be detectable yet.

For more information visit: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/nhs-test-and-trace-how-it-works.

Temporary changes to NHS services in Staffordshire and Stoke-on-Trent

Due to the increasing number of coronavirus cases in the UK, our local NHS Trusts, like many all over the country, have taken a range of measures to ensure that the hospitals, staff and patients remain safe. You can keep up to date with the ongoing updates via the links below:

University Hospitals of North Midlands NHS Trust (UHNM) updates

Midlands Partnership NHS Foundation Trust updates

University Hospitals of Derby and Burton NHS Foundation Trust updates

You can also find updates from North Staffordshire Combined NHS Trust via the updates page, here: North Staffordshire Combined NHS Trust coronavirus news

Information from councils, voluntary sector and other partners (including where to get help and support)

Local authorities

Local Authorities across Staffordshire and Stoke-on-Trent are working hard to support local people and businesses during the coronavirus outbreak. You can find lots of useful information here, from guidance on business grants/support, to advice on what you can do to help out in your local communities.

Stoke-on-Trent City Council

Information from Stoke-on-Trent City Council, including rent/financial advice for tenants, business support, school closures, waste services and much more can be found here.

Stoke-on-Trent City Council has also teamed up with several voluntary sector organisations, including VAST, to start #StokeonTrentTogether, the local COVID-19 support network. If you are looking for help, or wanting to support others in Stoke-on-Trent, please visit the website to find out more.

Staffordshire County Council

There is a lot of information available on the Staffordshire County Council website. This includes information about financial support for individuals or community groups, support for your business, information about mental health and wellbeing and much more.  

You can find all of this, plus information on how you can get help if you need it or how you can volunteer to help, here.

Local district and borough councils

The individual links below include local information about things such as business grants, waste collections and support for vulnerable people.

Cannock Chase District Council

East Staffordshire Borough Council

Lichfield District Council

Newcastle-under-Lyme Borough Council

South Staffordshire District Council

Staffordshire Borough Council

Staffordshire Moorlands District Council

Tamworth Borough Council

Useful resources

The Staffordshire and Stoke-on-Trent CCGs are producing weekly podcasts regarding coronavirus. You can listen to the podcasts here.

The following resources are available to support people with a learning disability and their families and carers:

We have also produced a guide for vulnerable people who might need extra support with things such as food parcels, collecting medicines, etc. due to coronavirus. You can find the guide, here: Guide for vulnerable people 

Public Health England has published a guide for older adults, looking at home-based activies and how people can maintain their strenth and balance. This can be found here.

You can find materials in different languages on the government website. There is also more information about coronavirus in other languages here. There are maternity-specific leaflets in different languages on the NHS website

We will share further resources as soon as they are available, including material for people with autism. Please head to our COVID-19 resource folder for the full suite of documents available. Follow this link to access our YouTube video library for coronavirus advice, including British Sign Language.

Local response to coronavirus

Please follow our social media channels to keep up to date with the latest information, including Facebook and Twitter.

Contact us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. if you have any questions, or if you would like any further local materials.